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Painting 3

This is the Second painting from the series of Stravinsky's Symphony in Three Movements, all from the first movement. JackOx©1980
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Continued from the artist: This is the second in the series of three paintings I made in 1979, just after moving to NYC. All are mappings from the first movement of his neo-classical work, 'Symphony in Three Movements'. Consonance and dissonance, with all of the possible shades between the, are extremely important to harmonically based music. And they are used differently by various composers. For instance, Bruckner pushed harmonic structure into the realm of chromatic language. However, he always resolved dissonance even if it took a while. So, for visualizing Bruckner a consonance is represented by colors that are pure hues, and the dissonant sounds are visualized through colors that include various percentages of complementary hues. Stravinsky is completely different as he does not resolve dissonance into consonance. For the paintings based on 'Symphony in Three Movements' the bright, pure glaze colors refer to dissonant sounds, as in the first and the third paintings. This second painting is actually very consonnant, therefore the transparent glaze colors are greyed out, brought to a place where cool and warm mingle, because they are relatively consonant. These greys are chromatic not achromatic (grays created from black and white).

The three images from the same NY City building alternate in a one-two-three pattern as they portray the french horn lines. Each view of the same building is painted in different colors so that it is easier to see the images change in the painting. Other musical lines are mapped to lighter and darker glazing colors.

Three images from the same NY City building alternate in a one-two-three pattern as they portray the french horn lines. Each view of the same building is painted in different colors so that it is easier to sense the image changes in the painting. Other musical lines are mapped to lighter and darker glazing colors.

This painting is circa 27 feet wide by 4feet high. It breaks down into 10 pieces around 3 feet wide. It has been hung around a board meeting room on two walls, with the next and last Stravinsky painting on a third wall. Both the second and the third are available at this time.

 

View of building from the right side.
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View of building from the center, looking up.
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View of the same building from the left, looking right.
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Stravinsky, Igor. (1945). Symphony in three movements: for Orchestra (Edition Schott 4075 ed.). NY/London: Associated Music Publishers, Inc. assigned to Schott & Co. Ltd.
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Above you can see where the passage depicted by the painting begins on the right third of the first page and continues to the next musical score, and into the top of the third page. Below are pages from Ox's notebook where she created the score for the painting.
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